Through Haitian Eyes

Missions of Love is a part of the people living in Jolivert, they always pray God to get the doctors, nurses, technicians, pastor, and supporters back often because they bring a new hope for them to recover health.

I have a lot of joy to serve Jesus by serving my brothers and sisters in the dental clinic. I love dentistry, but I have a huge love for helping people smile and keep this smile. I wish and I hope in other trips we will have some classes about medicine to debate and share knowledge with each other.

I pray God to keep MOL in our life and give them more health, more motivation, more donations, more money, more happiness, more faith, more prayers and more love to share with the Haitian community for more and more upcoming years.

Dr. Rousseau Hitler Ader, DDS

Dr. Asa 2017 Fall Team Report

” For our struggle is not against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the powers of this dark world and against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly realms.”  Ephesians 6:12

If I have learned nothing else after over twenty years of working in Haiti I believe that whatever project you went to do will not happen, at least not as you had planned. I also have learned that “I” can’t but “He” can. “Do not be afraid or discouraged …… For the battle is not yours, but God’s.” 2 Chron. 20:15

Our group started out with great plans and aspirations. Our friends from Tacoma who had built the incinerator shed two years ago were moved by the spirit to purchase the incinerator and come to Haiti to install it. Seven people formed a team and came to do that. Our arrival date was to be October 10.

The Evil One hates to see good people work for the Master and he goes right to work to try to thwart the plans we have for accomplishing God’s Will. The incinerator was scheduled to be on the dock in Port-au-Prince by October 2. Due to the hurricanes, the ship was rerouted and the date of arrival was postponed until October 18 – two days before we were to leave Haiti for home. Much prayer was raised and the ship came in from England on October 11. Still, there was the matter of customs charges, the bureaucracy of getting the item off the dock, the transportation of same to Jolivert, the inconvenience of a Haitian Holiday and intervening weekend preventing any action and our truck driver being too late to get on the dock one day. All of this required Blaud, our Haitian Executive Director, to remain in PAP for eight days with all the inherent unplanned costs.

While we worried and fidgeted in Jolivert the west coast team went right to work, helping Ralph Porter build shelves and cabinets for the dental clinic, assisting in the sorting and storage of materials that had been shipped in, helping out in the clinics, and doing anything that was needed to be done. One of the best children’s programs ever was put on, our evangelist preached in Sunday services and appeared on the church’s radio station several times, an outreach clinic was held for the first time as a medical/dental operation with 105 patients seen by our team doctors and nurses and 23 dental patients treated.

Duck, Duck, Goose

Additionally, Jonah, a thirteen-year-old boy who was there with his parents spontaneously crossed the language barrier and had the little children clapping, marching, running and learning “Duck, Duck, Goose”. This was a real ministry. Our Ophthalmology surgeon, in the meantime, screened patients and did 33 surgeries (22 cataract removals, seven removals of overgrown tissue and removal of a corneal foreign body that had been neglected for months). A number of other patients were cared for in the clinics by our visiting doctors and our visiting Haitian dentists.

Our Ophthalmology surgeon, in the meantime, screened patients and did 33 surgeries (22 cataract removals, seven removals of overgrown tissue and removal of a corneal foreign body that had been neglected for months). A number of other patients were cared for in the clinics by our visiting doctors and our visiting Haitian dentists.

We also began a renovation of the hill road and re-ditching for erosion prevention that was desperately needed. It was a large group – about 25 people at meals and our Haitian staff handled food, laundry, and transportation very well.

The Haitian government charged us the unconscionable amount of one-third the cost of the incinerator to get it off the dock but God enabled us to gather the funds and on the last day of work before departure the instrument arrived – as the shades of night were falling. Now that gripping question – how do we get 1200 pounds of machine off the truck and into the incinerator building without a forklift or crane? This is Haiti and God’s project! Boss Wilson, our longtime builder, mobilized his workers as has been done so often before. With the guidance of our team members, the brute strength of the Haitians inventive engineering and the Grace of God, it was moved off the truck, into the housing and now awaits another team trip to finish the task. In spite of the setback of completion, when you look at the overall trip, Satan lost and God won (AGAIN).

 

More than Expected

By Dr. Mick Vanden Bosch

Last year I went to Jolivert, Haiti for the first time.

I thought I was simply “scoping out the Eye Clinic” to see if we could do surgery. I ended up doing seven cataract surgeries, even though we had no Operating Room (OR) and limited equipment.

This year I hoped to perform 20 cataract surgeries or so. We brought everything we needed, but as I have found out many times before, on mission trips, not everything goes as planned. Not all of our equipment worked, so we improvised.

Although we still had no OR, we were able to set up a more sterile operating space.  I had a wonderful nurse, Jean Horner, an OB Nurse from Washington, who was also on our Mission team.  She committed to helping with the surgeries – pre-op set-up, circulating during surgery, and post-op clean up.

Cataracts in America are usually operated on when the vision drops three lines from 20/20 to 20/40, and it is difficult for the patient to maintain a driver’s license.  But, in Haiti, due to limited access to health care (and in younger persons probably a nutritional component that makes cataracts mature more quickly), the vision is much worse and the surgery has to be done in a way that is much more difficult.  The vision pre-op for our Haitian patients was at best 20/400 (the big “E” at the top of the chart). Most of our patients were unable to count fingers in front of their faces with a full one-half of the patients only able to see a light going on and off – not even able to detect motion. During our nine days of Eye Clinic service on this Fall trip, we were able to perform 22 cataract surgeries and 11 other various procedures for a total of 33 eye surgeries.

At the post-op visit the next day, although the communication barrier often made it difficult to ascertain just how well they were seeing, most of the patients were very grateful and praising God!

We saw at least six children on this visit that we could have helped surgically, but we didn’t have general anesthesia – Something to pray about and work towards.

Mick Vanden Bosch, MD specializes in Opthalmology and resides in South Dakota. For more information about Dr. Mick visit
http://www.sanfordhealth.org/find-a-doctor/mick-vanden-bosch

Employee Appreciation Dinner

On Valentine’s Day, MOL employees were treated to a love-themed appreciation night, which included a beautifully presented and delicious Haitian meal, light-hearted fellowship, a short devotion and encouragement to continue serving alongside Missions Of Love in the future as we continue to grow and serve our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ in and around the Jolivert area.

Feeding the Hungry Now and Helping them Feed Themselves Tomorrow

Food for the Hungry
“Feed the hungry, and help those in trouble. Then your light will shine out from the darkness.”
~ Isaiah 58:10

Because of the faithful giving to the Jolivert Feeding Program, commodities of rice, flour, cornmeal, macaroni, spaghetti, cooking oil and black beans were purchased, packaged and ready to be distributed to over 120 needy families.

Several boxes of garden seeds donated by NY Seed Programs International out of Asheville NC had been shipped to Dr. Bob and Betty Johnson recently, so Betty sent in several packages of garden seeds via February team member Warren Mattingly, enabling Blaud to package up and distribute several hundred packages containing okra, cabbage, tomato, beet, onion and eggplant seeds on Friday, Feb. 17th to nearby gardening families. Let’s join together in prayer that these crops will be blessed and grow abundantly!

Dolls on Mission

Dolls on Mission is a ministry of Angela Seng’s family’s company Seng Inc. They specialize in restoring Barbie dolls to like-new condition, then send them out with missionaries and mission teams around the world. February Mission team member, Becky Baise, packed in nearly 60 Seng ministry dolls to share with the young girls of the Jolivert area, brining smiles to young dental patients, students and friends of the Mission.

Anglea Seng sings and speaks about the doll ministry to raise money and awareness for this ministry as well as the Seng Family’s other ministries. “The response to this ministry has been overwhelming from those who have donated and to the children receiving the dolls,” Seng says. “Within the past 2 years we have restored over 1000 Barbie dolls.”

For more stories, videos, and info, visit their Web site at angelasengmusic.org.

Team: It’s all about HIM

February Team

Becky Baise
Cave City KY
Age: 50
Church: Coral Hill Baptist Church, Glasgow KY
Job: Compton Orthodontics, Bowling Green KY for 10 years as a Clinical Coordinator. Been in the dental/orthodontic field for 30 years.
”It is amazing to look back and see how the Lord had this whole trip planned… His loving hand on every detail months before it took place… how we saw Him touch so many people along the way, from the planning and still even with the memories and friendships He allows us to have with the Haitian people who touched our hearts. The worst part about this trip was the fact that we had to leave. I pray that the Lord will use our team and myself in Haiti again soon.”

Justin Crews
Glasgow KY
Age: 27
Job: Amneal Pharmaceuticals
Church: Coral Hill Baptist Church, Glasgow, KY

“Very humbling to be around the (Haitian) people working with them and learning their language. It was a blessing to be able to play soccer and share the gospel, and witness a young man being saved. It just showed me that He can use anyone regardless of where you are or who you’re sharing the gospel with… that is indescribable and a blessing.”

 

Jaycie Edwards
Glasgow, KY
Age: 18
Job: Hibbett Sports, babysitter and student
Church: Coral Hill Baptist Church

“Haiti is truly a beautiful country with beautiful people and beautiful hearts. I’ve left a big piece of my heart there and I am beyond blessed that The Lord provided me with the opportunity to share Christ’s love and experience his work happening right before my eyes. I pray I get to go back some day. Praise God!”

Warren Mattingly
Melbourne, FL
Age: 62
Job: Electrical Sign Contractor
Church: Christ Church of Hope

“It was such a blessing and honor to serve Christ in Haiti… to witness the love and kindness of our Lord Jesus Christ through the hard work of the Haitian dentis, the MOL staff, cooks, interpreters and our team. They were all such an inspiration. I still long for that sweet fellowship.

Mosquito Net Distribution


Thanks to the generosity of Malaria Fini, Missions Of Love was able to purchase 756 mosquito nets for FREE distribution to aid in the prevention of malaria.

The mosquito net distribution, conducted by MOL Director Blaud Mondesire, began at 2 p.m., Sunday, February 12th and lasted nearly three hours as hundreds came from Jolivert and 10 other surrounding villages and mountain communities.

As the crowds began to gather at the MOL gate, each were organized into groups with their community leaders, and were given anti-malaria education and instructions on how to properly us the nets by MOL Nurse, Edline Beaubrun. By the end of the distribution 550 colorful nets had been given to the selected families. Given the choice of a blue, rose, yellow or white net, the most favored color of all was rose. Why? Simply because the next day was Valentines Day!

The remaining mosquito nets were installed over beds on the MOL Campus and distributed the following day to the absentee families.

Dental Care… Because He Cares… We Care

Dental blessings did abound this February at Missions Of Love via the capable and compassionate hands of Doctors Ader Scott Rousseau, Eugene Hans and Marc Eli Vassor while assisted by Clinical Coordinator Becky Baise and student Jaycie Edwards (both of Kentucky) and Haitian Interpreter, Melinda Sainsurin.

The six-day Dental Clinic provided care to 142 patients, administering 386 patient services, including 53 cleanings, 101 fillings and 84 extractions. Please help us pray for more open doors to provide dental services on a more continued/frequent basis in Jolivert.

Stronger SMILES for STUDENTS
Armed With tiny brushes and thick, decay-fighting paste, Becky Baise, Justin Crews, Jayci Edwards and Ralph Porter, took too purposely coating each and every tooth in the mouths of pre-schoolers to high school-aged children who marched single file into the x-ray room-turned-dental triage. It also allowed for charting additional dental care as needed.
For two days, the foursome, along with the added assistance of MOL Vice-President, Nancy Bukovnik, and our interpreter, George Renaud, applied fluoride treatments to the teeth of 422 students from three nearby schools. Following the application, students were given a toothbrush and toothpaste to continue the fight for healthy teeth and gums.